Animalia > Chordata > Aves > Suliformes > Sulidae > Morus > Morus serrator
 

Morus serrator (Australasian Gannet)

Wikipedia Abstract

The Australasian gannet (Morus serrator or Sula bassana), also known as Australian gannet and Tākapu, is a large seabird of the gannet family Sulidae. Adults are mostly white, with black flight feathers at the wingtips and lining the trailing edge of the wing. The central tail feathers are also black. The head is yellow, with a pale blue-grey bill edged in black, and blue-rimmed eyes. Numbers of Australasian gannet have been increasing since 1950, although some colonies have disappeared and others have decreased in size.
View Wikipedia Record: Morus serrator

EDGE Analysis

Uniqueness Scale: Similiar (0) 
5
 Unique (100)
Uniqueness & Vulnerability Scale: Similiar & Secure (0) 
27
 Unique & Vulnerable (100)
ED Score: 11.255
EDGE Score: 2.50593

Attributes

Adult Weight [1]  4.846 lbs (2.198 kg)
Female Weight [1]  4.511 lbs (2.046 kg)
Male Weight [1]  5.181 lbs (2.35 kg)
Weight Dimorphism [1]  14.9 %
Diet [2]  Carnivore (Vertebrates), Piscivore
Diet - Fish [2]  90 %
Diet - Scavenger [2]  10 %
Forages - Underwater [2]  100 %
Clutch Size [3]  1
Clutches / Year [1]  1
Fledging [1]  3 months 10 days
Incubation [3]  44 days
Maximum Longevity [4]  33 years
Wing Span [5]  6.56 feet (2 m)

Ecoregions

Name Countries Ecozone Biome Species Report Climate Land
Use
Antipodes Subantarctic Islands tundra Australia, New Zealand Australasia Tundra    
Southern Indian Ocean Islands tundra South Africa, France, Australia Antarctic Tundra    

Protected Areas

Biodiversity Hotspots

Name Location Endemic Species Website
New Zealand New Zealand No
Southwest Australia Australia No

Prey / Diet

Prey / Diet Overlap

Consumers

Parasitized by 
Eidmanniella pustulosa[8]
Pectinopygus bassani[8]

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

    Maps
Institution Infraspecies / Breed 
Melbourne Zoo

Range Map

Distribution

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1Nathan P. Myhrvold, Elita Baldridge, Benjamin Chan, Dhileep Sivam, Daniel L. Freeman, and S. K. Morgan Ernest. 2015. An amniote life-history database to perform comparative analyses with birds, mammals, and reptiles. Ecology 96:3109
2Hamish Wilman, Jonathan Belmaker, Jennifer Simpson, Carolina de la Rosa, Marcelo M. Rivadeneira, and Walter Jetz. 2014. EltonTraits 1.0: Species-level foraging attributes of the world's birds and mammals. Ecology 95:2027
3del Hoyo, J., Elliott, A., Sargatal, J., Christie, D.A. & de Juana, E. (eds.). Handbook of the Birds of the World Alive. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.
4de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774
5Bird species of concern at wind farms in New Zealand, R.G. Powlesland, September 2009, New Zealand Department of Conservation
6Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
7DIET OF THE AUSTRALASIAN GANNET MORUS SERRATOR (G.R. GRAY) AROUND NEW ZEALAND, D.A. ROBERTSON, New Zealand Journal of Ecology (1992) 16(2): 77-81
8Species Interactions of Australia Database, Atlas of Living Australia, Version ala-csv-2012-11-19
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Biodiversity Hotspots provided by Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License