Animalia > Chordata > Aves > Passeriformes > Thraupidae > Ramphocelus > Ramphocelus carbo
 

Ramphocelus carbo (Silver-beaked Tanager)

Wikipedia Abstract

The silver-beaked tanager (Ramphocelus carbo) is a medium-sized passerine bird. This tanager is a resident breeder in South America from eastern Colombia and Venezuela south to Paraguay and central Brazil, and on Trinidad. It is common and conspicuous. There is considerable plumage variation between the various subspecies, differing mainly in the degree of contrast between the upperparts and the throat and breast. The silver-beaked tanager was first described by the German naturalist Peter Simon Pallas in 1764 and given the binomial name Lanius carbo.
View Wikipedia Record: Ramphocelus carbo

Infraspecies

EDGE Analysis

Uniqueness Scale: Similiar (0) 
0
 Unique (100)
Uniqueness & Vulnerability Scale: Similiar & Secure (0) 
4
 Unique & Vulnerable (100)
ED Score: 1.88083
EDGE Score: 1.05808

Attributes

Adult Weight [1]  28.5 grams
Diet [2]  Carnivore (Invertebrates), Frugivore
Diet - Fruit [2]  50 %
Diet - Invertibrates [2]  50 %
Forages - Canopy [2]  10 %
Forages - Mid-High [2]  40 %
Forages - Understory [2]  50 %
Clutch Size [3]  2
Incubation [3]  12 days

Ecoregions

Protected Areas

Biodiversity Hotspots

Name Location Endemic Species Website
Atlantic Forest Argentina, Brazil, Paraguay, Uruguay No
Caribbean Islands Anguilla, Antigua and Barbuda, Aruba, Bahamas, Barbados, Cayman Islands, Cuba, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Haiti, Grenada, Guadeloupe, Jamaica, Martinique, Montserrat, Netherlands Antilles, Puerto Rico, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent And The Grenadines, Trinidad and Tobago, Turks And Caicos Islands, Virgin Islands - British, Virgin Islands - U.S. No
Cerrado Brazil No
Tropical Andes Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, Venezuela No

Prey / Diet

Prey / Diet Overlap

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

Range Map

Distribution

External References

Audio

Play / PauseVolume
Provided by Xeno-canto under a Creative Commons BY-NC-ND 2.5 License Author: Miguel Castelino

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1THE FEEDING ECOLOGY OF TANAGERS AND HONEYCREEPERS IN TRINIDAD, Barbara K. Snow and D. W. Snow, The Auk, 88: 291-322 (1971)
2Hamish Wilman, Jonathan Belmaker, Jennifer Simpson, Carolina de la Rosa, Marcelo M. Rivadeneira, and Walter Jetz. 2014. EltonTraits 1.0: Species-level foraging attributes of the world's birds and mammals. Ecology 95:2027
3del Hoyo, J., Elliott, A., Sargatal, J., Christie, D.A. & de Juana, E. (eds.). Handbook of the Birds of the World Alive. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.
4The Feeding Ecology of Tanagers and Honeycreepers in Trinidad, Barbara K. Snow and D. W. Snow, The Auk Vol. 88, No. 2 (Apr., 1971), pp. 291-322
5Avifauna dispersora de sementes de Alchornea glandulosa (Euphorbiaceae) em uma área de mata ciliar no estado de São Paulo Márcia Cristina Pascotto; Revista Brasileira de Ornitologia 14 (3) 291-296 setembro de 2006
6The sweet jelly of Combretum lanceolatum flowers (Combretaceae): a cornucopia resource for bird pollinators in the Pantanal, western Brazil, M. Sazima, S. Vogel, A. L. do Prado, D. M. de Oliveira, G. Franz, and I. Sazima, Plant Syst. Evol. 227: 195-208 (2001)
7"Fig-eating by vertebrate frugivores: a global review", MIKE SHANAHAN, SAMSON SO, STEPHEN G. COMPTON and RICHARD CORLETT, Biol. Rev. (2001), 76, pp. 529–572
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Biodiversity Hotspots provided by Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License
Audio software provided by SoundManager 2