Animalia > Chordata > Aves > Passeriformes > Cracticidae > Strepera > Strepera graculina
 

Strepera graculina (Pied Currawong)

Wikipedia Abstract

The pied currawong (Strepera graculina) is a medium-sized black passerine bird native to eastern Australia and Lord Howe Island. One of three currawong species in the genus Strepera, it is closely related to the butcherbirds and Australian magpie of the family Artamidae. Six subspecies are recognised. It is a robust crowlike bird averaging around 48 cm (19 in) in length, black or sooty grey-black in plumage with white undertail and wing patches, yellow irises, and a heavy bill. The male and female are similar in appearance. Known for its melodious calls, the species' name currawong is believed to be of indigenous origin.
View Wikipedia Record: Strepera graculina

Infraspecies

EDGE Analysis

Uniqueness Scale: Similiar (0) 
4
 Unique (100)
Uniqueness & Vulnerability Scale: Similiar & Secure (0) 
24
 Unique & Vulnerable (100)
ED Score: 9.31638
EDGE Score: 2.33373

Attributes

Adult Weight [1]  300 grams
Female Weight [3]  280 grams
Male Weight [3]  319 grams
Weight Dimorphism [3]  13.9 %
Diet [2]  Carnivore (Invertebrates), Carnivore (Vertebrates), Frugivore, Granivore
Diet - Fruit [2]  30 %
Diet - Invertibrates [2]  30 %
Diet - Seeds [2]  20 %
Diet - Vertibrates [2]  20 %
Forages - Aerial [2]  10 %
Forages - Canopy [2]  20 %
Forages - Mid-High [2]  20 %
Forages - Understory [2]  20 %
Forages - Ground [2]  30 %
Clutch Size [5]  3
Incubation [4]  21 days
Maximum Longevity [1]  13 years

Ecoregions

Protected Areas

Biodiversity Hotspots

Name Location Endemic Species Website
New Zealand New Zealand No

Prey / Diet

Prey / Diet Overlap

Predators

Varanus varius (Lace Monitor)[9]

Consumers

Distribution

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1Nathan P. Myhrvold, Elita Baldridge, Benjamin Chan, Dhileep Sivam, Daniel L. Freeman, and S. K. Morgan Ernest. 2015. An amniote life-history database to perform comparative analyses with birds, mammals, and reptiles. Ecology 96:3109
2Hamish Wilman, Jonathan Belmaker, Jennifer Simpson, Carolina de la Rosa, Marcelo M. Rivadeneira, and Walter Jetz. 2014. EltonTraits 1.0: Species-level foraging attributes of the world's birds and mammals. Ecology 95:2027
3Higgins, PJ, Peter, JM and Cowling, SJ. (eds), (2006) Handbook of Australian, New Zealand and Antarctic birds, Volume 7: Boatbill to starlings. Oxford University Press, Melbourne
4del Hoyo, J., Elliott, A., Sargatal, J., Christie, D.A. & de Juana, E. (eds.). Handbook of the Birds of the World Alive. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.
5Jetz W, Sekercioglu CH, Böhning-Gaese K (2008) The Worldwide Variation in Avian Clutch Size across Species and Space PLoS Biol 6(12): e303. doi:10.1371/journal.pbio.0060303
6Food of some birds in eastern New South Wales: additions to Barker & Vestjens. Emu 93(3): 195–199
7Chalinolobus gouldii, Bryan Chruszcz and Robert M. R. Barclay, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 690, pp. 1–4 (2002)
8"Fig-eating by vertebrate frugivores: a global review", MIKE SHANAHAN, SAMSON SO, STEPHEN G. COMPTON and RICHARD CORLETT, Biol. Rev. (2001), 76, pp. 529–572
9Diet of the Lace Monitor Lizard (Varanus varius) in south-eastern Australia, Brian W. Weavers, Australian Zoologist, Vol. 25(3) 83-85
10Species Interactions of Australia Database, Atlas of Living Australia, Version ala-csv-2012-11-19
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Biodiversity Hotspots provided by Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License