Animalia > Chordata > Mammalia > Primates > Lemuroidea > Lemuridae > Varecia > Varecia variegata
 

Varecia variegata (ruffed lemur)

Wikipedia Abstract

The black-and-white ruffed lemur (Varecia variegata) is the more endangered of the two species of ruffed lemurs, both of which are endemic to the island of Madagascar. Despite having a larger range than the red ruffed lemur, it has a much smaller population that is spread out, living in lower population densities and reproductively isolated. It also has less coverage and protection in large national parks than the red ruffed lemur. Three subspecies of black-and-white ruffed lemur have been recognized since the red ruffed lemur was elevated to species status in 2001.
View Wikipedia Record: Varecia variegata

Infraspecies

Varecia variegata editorum (Southern Black-and-White Ruffed Lemur)
Varecia variegata subcincta (Northern Black-and-White Ruffed Lemur)
Varecia variegata variegata (Variegated Ruffed Lemur)

Endangered Species

Status: Critically Endangered
View IUCN Record: Varecia variegata

EDGE Analysis

The black and white ruffed lemurs are the largest living members of the family Lemurinae. As such they have been excessively hunted, whilst much of their habitat has been deforested. They are also impacted by practices such as selective logging. The range of the black and white ruffed lemur extends in a line down the eastern Malagasay coast from a southern limit around the Mananara River near Vangaindrano to a northern limit somewhat north and west of Maroantsetra, on the Bay of Antongil. However, the remaining population is patchily distributed and has undergone a decline of over 80% in the last 27 years. Whilst some individuals are known to occur in protected areas, further designation and enforcement is required to protect this species.
Uniqueness Scale: Similiar (0) 
7
 Unique (100)
Uniqueness & Vulnerability Scale: Similiar & Secure (0) 
74
 Unique & Vulnerable (100)
ED Score: 15.03
EDGE Score: 5.55
View EDGE Record: Varecia variegata

Attributes

Arboreal [1]  Yes
Gestation [2]  3 months 9 days
Litter Size [2]  2
Litters / Year [2]  1
Maximum Longevity [2]  36 years
Snout to Vent Length [4]  22 inches (55 cm)
Weaning [2]  3 months 22 days
Adult Weight [2]  8.091 lbs (3.67 kg)
Birth Weight [2]  87 grams
Diet [3]  Frugivore
Diet - Fruit [3]  100 %
Forages - Arboreal [3]  100 %
Female Maturity [2]  1 year 7 months
Male Maturity [2]  1 year 8 months

Ecoregions

Name Countries Ecozone Biome Species Report Climate Land
Use
Madagascar lowland forests Madagascar Afrotropic Tropical and Subtropical Moist Broadleaf Forests
Madagascar subhumid forests Madagascar Afrotropic Tropical and Subtropical Moist Broadleaf Forests

Protected Areas

Biodiversity Hotspots

Name Location Endemic Species Website
Madagascar and the Indian Ocean Islands Comoros, Madagascar, Mauritius, Seychelles Yes

Prey / Diet

Ficus lutea (West African rubbertree)[5]
Ficus reflexa[5]
Ficus tiliifolia[5]

Prey / Diet Overlap

Predators

Cryptoprocta ferox (Fossa)[6]

Consumers

Parasitized by 
Haemaphysalis lemuris[7]

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

Range Map

Distribution

Africa;

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1Myers, P., R. Espinosa, C. S. Parr, T. Jones, G. S. Hammond, and T. A. Dewey. 2006. The Animal Diversity Web (online). Accessed February 01, 2010 at animaldiversity.org
2de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774
3Hamish Wilman, Jonathan Belmaker, Jennifer Simpson, Carolina de la Rosa, Marcelo M. Rivadeneira, and Walter Jetz. 2014. EltonTraits 1.0: Species-level foraging attributes of the world's birds and mammals. Ecology 95:2027
4Nathan P. Myhrvold, Elita Baldridge, Benjamin Chan, Dhileep Sivam, Daniel L. Freeman, and S. K. Morgan Ernest. 2015. An amniote life-history database to perform comparative analyses with birds, mammals, and reptiles. Ecology 96:3109
5"Fig-eating by vertebrate frugivores: a global review", MIKE SHANAHAN, SAMSON SO, STEPHEN G. COMPTON and RICHARD CORLETT, Biol. Rev. (2001), 76, pp. 529–572
6Predation on Lemurs in the Rainforest of Madagascar by Multiple Predator Species: Observations and Experiments, Sarah M. Karpanty and Patricia C. Wright, Primate Anti-Predator Strategies, Developments in Primatology: Progress and Prospects, 2007, Part 2, 77-99
7Nunn, C. L., and S. Altizer. 2005. The Global Mammal Parasite Database: An Online Resource for Infectious Disease Records in Wild Primates. Evolutionary Anthroplogy 14:1-2.
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Protected Areas provided by Biological Inventories of the World's Protected Areas in cooperation between the Information Center for the Environment at the University of California, Davis and numerous collaborators.
Le Saout, S., Hoffmann, M., Shi, Y., Hughes, A., Bernard, C., Brooks, T.M., Bertzky, B., Butchart, S.H.M., Stuart, S.N., Badman, T. & Rodrigues, A.S.L. (2013) Protected areas and effective biodiversity conservation. Science, 342, 803–805
Biodiversity Hotspots provided by Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund
Images provided by Wikimedia Commons licensed under a Creative Commons License
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License