Animalia > Chordata > Mammalia > Primates > Atelidae > Ateles > Ateles belzebuth
 

Ateles belzebuth (white-bellied spider monkey)

Synonyms:

Wikipedia Abstract

The white-bellied spider monkey (Ateles belzebuth), also known as the white-fronted or long-haired spider monkey, is an endangered species of spider monkey, a type of New World monkey. It is found in the north-western Amazon in Colombia, Ecuador, Venezuela, Peru and Brazil, ranging as far south as the lower Ucayali River and as far east as the Branco River. In the past, the Peruvian, brown and white-cheeked spider monkeys have been treated as subspecies of A. belzebuth. As presently defined, the white-bellied spider monkey is monotypic. It has a whitish belly and a pale patch on the forehead, which, despite its common name, often is orange-buff. They live in groups of 20 to 40 individuals, splitting into small parties of 1 to 9 when in activity.
View Wikipedia Record: Ateles belzebuth

Endangered Species

Status: Endangered
View IUCN Record: Ateles belzebuth

EDGE Analysis

Uniqueness Scale: Similiar (0) 
3
 Unique (100)
Uniqueness & Vulnerability Scale: Similiar & Secure (0) 
52
 Unique & Vulnerable (100)
ED Score: 6.9
EDGE Score: 4.15

Attributes

Arboreal [1]  Yes
Emoji [4]  monkey
Gestation [2]  6 months 4 days
Litter Size [2]  1
Litters / Year [2]  0.3
Maximum Longevity [2]  37 years
Adult Weight [2]  16.612 lbs (7.535 kg)
Diet [3]  Carnivore (Invertebrates), Carnivore (Vertebrates), Frugivore, Granivore, Herbivore
Diet - Fruit [3]  60 %
Diet - Invertibrates [3]  10 %
Diet - Plants [3]  10 %
Diet - Seeds [3]  10 %
Diet - Vertibrates [3]  10 %
Forages - Arboreal [3]  100 %
Female Maturity [2]  4 years
Male Maturity [2]  5 years

Ecoregions

Protected Areas

Biodiversity Hotspots

Name Location Endemic Species Website
Tropical Andes Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, Venezuela No

Prey / Diet

Prey / Diet Overlap

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

Range Map

Distribution

South America;

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1Myers, P., R. Espinosa, C. S. Parr, T. Jones, G. S. Hammond, and T. A. Dewey. 2006. The Animal Diversity Web (online). Accessed February 01, 2010 at animaldiversity.org
2de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774
3Hamish Wilman, Jonathan Belmaker, Jennifer Simpson, Carolina de la Rosa, Marcelo M. Rivadeneira, and Walter Jetz. 2014. EltonTraits 1.0: Species-level foraging attributes of the world's birds and mammals. Ecology 95:2027
4Emoji by Twitter is licensed under CC BY 4.0
5Foods and Feeding Behavior of Wild Black-capped Capuchin (Cebus apella), KOSEI IZAWA, PRIMATES, 20(1): 57-76, January 1979
6"Fig-eating by vertebrate frugivores: a global review", MIKE SHANAHAN, SAMSON SO, STEPHEN G. COMPTON and RICHARD CORLETT, Biol. Rev. (2001), 76, pp. 529–572
7Holbrook, KM, and BA Loiselle. 2009. Dispersal in a neotropical tree, Virola flexuosa (Myristicaceae): Does hunting of large vertebrates limit seed removal? Ecology 90: 1449–1455
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Protected Areas provided by Biological Inventories of the World's Protected Areas in cooperation between the Information Center for the Environment at the University of California, Davis and numerous collaborators.
Le Saout, S., Hoffmann, M., Shi, Y., Hughes, A., Bernard, C., Brooks, T.M., Bertzky, B., Butchart, S.H.M., Stuart, S.N., Badman, T. & Rodrigues, A.S.L. (2013) Protected areas and effective biodiversity conservation. Science, 342, 803–805
Biodiversity Hotspots provided by Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License