Animalia > Chordata > Mammalia > Primates > Cebidae > Sapajus > Sapajus apella
 

Sapajus apella (brown capuchin; Tufted Capuchin; Black-capped Capuchin)

Synonyms:

Wikipedia Abstract

The tufted capuchin (Sapajus apella), also known as brown capuchin, black-capped capuchin, or pin monkey is a New World primate from South America. As traditionally defined, it is one of the most widespread primates in the Neotropics, but it has recently been recommended considering the black-striped, black and golden-bellied capuchins as separate species in a new genus, thereby effectively limiting the tufted capuchin to the Amazon basin and nearby regions. Like other capuchins, it is a social animal, forming groups of 8 to 15 individuals that are led by an alpha or dominant male.
View Wikipedia Record: Sapajus apella

Infraspecies

Sapajus apella apella (Guianan Brown Capuchin)
Sapajus apella margaritae (Margarita Island Capuchin)

EDGE Analysis

Uniqueness Scale: Similiar (0) 
3
 Unique (100)
Uniqueness & Vulnerability Scale: Similiar & Secure (0) 
20
 Unique & Vulnerable (100)
ED Score: 6.93
EDGE Score: 2.07

Attributes

Arboreal [1]  Yes
Gestation [2]  5 months 8 days
Litter Size [2]  2
Litters / Year [2]  1
Maximum Longevity [2]  46 years
Weaning [2]  10 months 7 days
Adult Weight [2]  5.827 lbs (2.643 kg)
Birth Weight [2]  240 grams
Diet [3]  Carnivore (Invertebrates), Carnivore (Vertebrates), Frugivore, Nectarivore, Granivore, Herbivore
Diet - Fruit [3]  20 %
Diet - Invertibrates [3]  20 %
Diet - Nectar [3]  10 %
Diet - Plants [3]  20 %
Diet - Seeds [3]  20 %
Diet - Vertibrates [3]  10 %
Forages - Arboreal [3]  100 %
Female Maturity [2]  4 years 8 months

Ecoregions

Protected Areas

Ecosystems

Biodiversity Hotspots

Name Location Endemic Species Website
Cerrado Brazil No
Tropical Andes Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, Venezuela No

Prey / Diet

Prey / Diet Overlap

+ Click for partial list (45)Full list (165)

Predators

Harpia harpyja (Harpy Eagle)[6]
Panthera onca (Jaguar)[6]

Consumers

Parasitized by 
Dipetalonema gracile <Unverified Name>[9]
Filariopsis barretoi <Unverified Name>[9]
Molineus torulosus <Unverified Name>[9]
Trichostrongylus cesticillus <Unverified Name>[9]

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

Range Map

Distribution

South America;

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1Myers, P., R. Espinosa, C. S. Parr, T. Jones, G. S. Hammond, and T. A. Dewey. 2006. The Animal Diversity Web (online). Accessed February 01, 2010 at animaldiversity.org
2de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774
3Hamish Wilman, Jonathan Belmaker, Jennifer Simpson, Carolina de la Rosa, Marcelo M. Rivadeneira, and Walter Jetz. 2014. EltonTraits 1.0: Species-level foraging attributes of the world's birds and mammals. Ecology 95:2027
4Foods and Feeding Behavior of Wild Black-capped Capuchin (Cebus apella), KOSEI IZAWA, PRIMATES, 20(1): 57-76, January 1979
5SEED PREDATION OF COURATARI GUIANENSIS (LECYTHIDACEAE) BY MACAWS IN CENTRAL AMAZONIA, BRAZIL, Torbjørn Haugaasen, ORNITOLOGIA NEOTROPICAL 19: 321–328, 2008
6Animals of the Rainforest
7Diet of the Scaly-headed Parrot (Pionus maximiliani) in a Semideciduous Forest in Southeastern Brazil, Mauro Galetti, BIOTROPICA 25(4): 419-425 1993
8"Fig-eating by vertebrate frugivores: a global review", MIKE SHANAHAN, SAMSON SO, STEPHEN G. COMPTON and RICHARD CORLETT, Biol. Rev. (2001), 76, pp. 529–572
9Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Biodiversity Hotspots provided by Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License