Animalia > Chordata > Mammalia > Primates > Cercopithecoidea > Cercopithecidae > Pygathrix > Pygathrix nemaeus
 

Pygathrix nemaeus (Douc langur)

Wikipedia Abstract

The red-shanked douc (Pygathrix nemaeus) is a species of Old World monkey, among the most colourful of all primates. This monkey is sometimes called the "costumed ape" for its extravagant appearance. From its knees to its ankles it sports maroon-red "stockings", and it appears to wear white forearm length gloves. Its attire is finished with black hands and feet. The golden face is framed by a white ruff, which is considerably fluffier in males. The eyelids are a soft powder blue. The tail is white with a triangle of white hair at the base. Males of all ages have a white spot on both sides of the corners of the rump patch, and red and white genitals.
View Wikipedia Record: Pygathrix nemaeus

Endangered Species

Status: Endangered
View IUCN Record: Pygathrix nemaeus

EDGE Analysis

Uniqueness Scale: Similiar (0) 
2
 Unique (100)
Uniqueness & Vulnerability Scale: Similiar & Secure (0) 
50
 Unique & Vulnerable (100)
ED Score: 5.9
EDGE Score: 4.01

Attributes

Arboreal [1]  Yes
Gestation [2]  5 months 21 days
Litter Size [2]  1
Litters / Year [2]  1
Maximum Longevity [2]  26 years
Weaning [2]  11 months
Adult Weight [2]  21.429 lbs (9.72 kg)
Birth Weight [2]  394 grams
Diet [3]  Frugivore, Herbivore
Diet - Fruit [3]  20 %
Diet - Plants [3]  80 %
Forages - Arboreal [3]  100 %
Female Maturity [2]  4 years

Ecoregions

Protected Areas

Biodiversity Hotspots

Name Location Endemic Species Website
Indo-Burma Bangladesh, Cambodia, China, India, Laos, Myanmar, Thailand, Viet Nam Yes

Prey / Diet

Ficus hispida[4]
Ficus minahassae (clustertree)[4]
Ficus religiosa (peepul tree)[4]
Ficus vasculosa[4]

Prey / Diet Overlap

Predators

Homo sapiens (man)[5]

Consumers

Parasitized by 
Bertiella studeri <Unverified Name>[6]

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

Range Map

Distribution

Southern Asia;

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1Myers, P., R. Espinosa, C. S. Parr, T. Jones, G. S. Hammond, and T. A. Dewey. 2006. The Animal Diversity Web (online). Accessed February 01, 2010 at animaldiversity.org
2de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774
3Hamish Wilman, Jonathan Belmaker, Jennifer Simpson, Carolina de la Rosa, Marcelo M. Rivadeneira, and Walter Jetz. 2014. EltonTraits 1.0: Species-level foraging attributes of the world's birds and mammals. Ecology 95:2027
4"Fig-eating by vertebrate frugivores: a global review", MIKE SHANAHAN, SAMSON SO, STEPHEN G. COMPTON and RICHARD CORLETT, Biol. Rev. (2001), 76, pp. 529–572
5Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
6Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Biodiversity Hotspots provided by Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License