Animalia > Arthropoda > Insecta > Hymenoptera > Vespoidea > Formicidae > Lasius > Lasius niger
 

Lasius niger (Black garden ant)

Wikipedia Abstract

The black garden ant (Lasius niger), also known as the common black ant, is a formicine ant, the type species of the subgenus Lasius, found all over Europe and in some parts of North America and Asia. The European species was split into two species; L. niger is found in open areas, while L. platythorax is found in forest habitats. It is monogynous, meaning colonies have a single queen. Lasius niger is host to a number of temporary social parasites of the Lasius mixtus group including Lasius mixtus and Lasius umbratus.
View Wikipedia Record: Lasius niger

Infraspecies

Attributes

Maximum Longevity [1]  28 years

Protected Areas

Ecosystems

Predators

Providers

Mutual (symbiont) 
Aphis acetosae[2]
Aphis brohmeri[2]
Aphis fabae (Bean aphid)[2]
Aphis sambuci (Elder Aphid)[2]
Aphis urticata[2]

Consumers

Distribution

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774
2Ecology of Commanster
3Predator-Prey Database for the family Asilidae (Hexapoda: Diptera) Prepared by Dr. Robert Lavigne, Professor Emeritus, University of Wyoming, USA and Dr. Jason Londt (Natal Museum, Pietermaritzburg)
4Diet composition and prey choice by the red-backed shrike Lanius collurio in western Poland, Piotr Tryjanowski, Malgorzata Karolina Karg, Jerzy Karg, Belg. J. Zool., 133 (2) : 157-162 (2003)
5Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
6Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
7Kato, M., T. Makutani, T. Inoue, and T. Itino. 1990. Insect-flower relationship in the primary beech forest of Ashu, Kyoto: an overview of the flowering phenology and seasonal pattern of insect visits. Contr. Biol. Lab. Kyoto Univ. 27:309-375.
8Robertson, C. Flowers and insects lists of visitors of four hundred and fifty three flowers. 1929. The Science Press Printing Company Lancaster, PA.
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Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License