Animalia > Chordata > Mammalia > Hyracoidea > Procaviidae > Procavia > Procavia capensis
 

Procavia capensis (Rock Hyrax)

Wikipedia Abstract

The rock hyrax (Procavia capensis) or rock badger, also called the Cape hyrax and commonly referred to in South African English as the dassie, is one of the four living species of the order Hyracoidea, and the only living species in the genus Procavia. Like all hyraxes, it is a medium-sized (~4 kg) terrestrial mammal, superficially resembling a guinea pig with short ears and tail. The closest living relatives to hyraxes are the modern-day elephants and sirenians. The rock hyrax is found across Africa and the Middle East, in habitats with rock crevices in which to escape from predators. It is the only extant terrestrial afrotherian in the Middle East. Hyraxes typically live in groups of 10–80 animals, and forage as a group. They have been reported to use sentries: one or more animals take u
View Wikipedia Record: Procavia capensis

Infraspecies

EDGE Analysis

Uniqueness Scale: Similiar (0) 
15
 Unique (100)
Uniqueness & Vulnerability Scale: Similiar & Secure (0) 
42
 Unique & Vulnerable (100)
ED Score: 30.4
EDGE Score: 3.45

Attributes

Adult Weight [1]  7.937 lbs (3.60 kg)
Birth Weight [1]  205 grams
Male Weight [3]  4.464 lbs (2.025 kg)
Diet [2]  Herbivore
Diet - Plants [2]  100 %
Forages - Ground [2]  100 %
Female Maturity [1]  1 year 4 months
Male Maturity [1]  1 year 4 months
Gestation [1]  7 months 5 days
Litter Size [1]  3
Litters / Year [1]  1
Maximum Longevity [1]  15 years
Snout to Vent Length [3]  20 inches (51 cm)
Weaning [1]  3 months 26 days

Ecoregions

Protected Areas

Biodiversity Hotspots

Prey / Diet

Ficus burtt-davyi (Veld Fig)[4]
Ficus cordata (Namaqua Fig)[5]
Ficus elastica (indian rubber fig)[4]
Lobelia giberroa[6]

Prey / Diet Overlap

Predators

Canis mesomelas (Black-backed Jackal)[7]

Consumers

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

Range Map

Distribution

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774
2Hamish Wilman, Jonathan Belmaker, Jennifer Simpson, Carolina de la Rosa, Marcelo M. Rivadeneira, and Walter Jetz. 2014. EltonTraits 1.0: Species-level foraging attributes of the world's birds and mammals. Ecology 95:2027
3Nathan P. Myhrvold, Elita Baldridge, Benjamin Chan, Dhileep Sivam, Daniel L. Freeman, and S. K. Morgan Ernest. 2015. An amniote life-history database to perform comparative analyses with birds, mammals, and reptiles. Ecology 96:3109
4"Fig-eating by vertebrate frugivores: a global review", MIKE SHANAHAN, SAMSON SO, STEPHEN G. COMPTON and RICHARD CORLETT, Biol. Rev. (2001), 76, pp. 529–572
5Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
6Procavia capensis, Nancy Olds and Jeheskel Shoshani, Mammalian Species No. 171, pp. 1-7 (1982)
7Canis mesomelas, Lyle R. Walton and Damien O. Joly, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 715, pp. 1–9 (2003)
8Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
9International Flea Database
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Biodiversity Hotspots provided by Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License