Animalia > Chordata > Mammalia > Carnivora > Ursidae > Melursus > Melursus ursinus
 

Melursus ursinus (Sloth Bear)

Wikipedia Abstract

The sloth bear (Melursus ursinus), also known as the labiated bear, is a nocturnal insectivorous bear species native to the Indian subcontinent. The sloth bear evolved from ancestral brown bears during the Pleistocene and shares features found in insect-eating mammals through convergent evolution. The population isolated in Sri Lanka is considered a subspecies. Unlike brown and black bears, sloth bears have lankier builds, long, shaggy coats that form a mane around the face, long, sickle-shaped claws, and a specially adapted lower lip and palate used for sucking insects. Sloth bears breed during spring and early summer and give birth near the beginning of winter. They feed on termites, honeybee colonies, and fruits. Sloth bears sometimes attack humans who encroach on their territories. His
View Wikipedia Record: Melursus ursinus

Infraspecies

Melursus ursinus inornatus (Sri Lankan sloth bear)
Melursus ursinus ursinus (Indian sloth bear)

EDGE Analysis

Uniqueness Scale: Similiar (0) 
8
 Unique (100)
Uniqueness & Vulnerability Scale: Similiar & Secure (0) 
54
 Unique & Vulnerable (100)
ED Score: 16.5
EDGE Score: 4.25

Attributes

Adult Weight [1]  220.463 lbs (100.00 kg)
Birth Weight [1]  400 grams
Diet [2]  Carnivore (Invertebrates), Frugivore, Herbivore
Diet - Fruit [2]  10 %
Diet - Invertibrates [2]  70 %
Diet - Plants [2]  20 %
Forages - Ground [2]  100 %
Female Maturity [1]  3 years
Male Maturity [1]  3 years
Gestation [1]  6 months 18 days
Litter Size [1]  2
Maximum Longevity [1]  33 years
Nocturnal [3]  Yes
Weaning [1]  76 days

Ecoregions

Protected Areas

Biodiversity Hotspots

Name Location Endemic Species Website
Himalaya Bhutan, China, India, Myanmar, Nepal, Pakistan No
Indo-Burma Bangladesh, Cambodia, China, India, Laos, Myanmar, Thailand, Viet Nam No
Western Ghats and Sri Lanka India, Sri Lanka No

Prey / Diet

Prey / Diet Overlap

+ Click for partial list (42)Full list (139)

Predators

Panthera pardus (Leopard)[5]
Panthera tigris (Tiger)[5]

Consumers

Parasitized by 
Ancylostoma caninum[7]

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

Range Map

Distribution

Southern Asia;

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774
2Hamish Wilman, Jonathan Belmaker, Jennifer Simpson, Carolina de la Rosa, Marcelo M. Rivadeneira, and Walter Jetz. 2014. EltonTraits 1.0: Species-level foraging attributes of the world's birds and mammals. Ecology 95:2027
3Myers, P., R. Espinosa, C. S. Parr, T. Jones, G. S. Hammond, and T. A. Dewey. 2006. The Animal Diversity Web (online). Accessed February 01, 2010 at animaldiversity.org
4Feeding ecology of sloth bears in a disturbed area in central India, H.S. Bargali, Naim Akhtar,and N.P.S. Chauhan, Ursus 15(2):212-217 (2004)
5Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
6"Fig-eating by vertebrate frugivores: a global review", MIKE SHANAHAN, SAMSON SO, STEPHEN G. COMPTON and RICHARD CORLETT, Biol. Rev. (2001), 76, pp. 529–572
7Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Biodiversity Hotspots provided by Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License