Animalia > Chordata > Mammalia > Carnivora > Procyonidae > Bassaricyon > Bassaricyon gabbii
 

Bassaricyon gabbii (Olingo)

Synonyms: Bassaricyon lasius; Bassaricyon pauli; Bassaricyon richardsoni

Wikipedia Abstract

The northern olingo (Bassaricyon gabbii), also known as the bushy-tailed olingo or as simply the olingo (due to it being the most commonly seen of the species), is a tree-dwelling member of the family Procyonidae, which also includes raccoons. It was the first species of olingo to be described, and while it is considered by some authors to be the only genuine olingo species, a recent review of the Bassaricyon genus has shown that there are a total of four olingo species, although two of the former species should now be considered as a part of this species. Its scientific name honors William More Gabb, who collected the first specimen. It is native to Central America.
View Wikipedia Record: Bassaricyon gabbii

EDGE Analysis

Uniqueness Scale: Similiar (0) 
5
 Unique (100)
Uniqueness & Vulnerability Scale: Similiar & Secure (0) 
27
 Unique & Vulnerable (100)
ED Score: 11.73
EDGE Score: 2.54

Attributes

Arboreal [1]  Yes
Gestation [2]  73 days
Litter Size [2]  1
Maximum Longevity [2]  22 years
Nocturnal [1]  Yes
Adult Weight [2]  2.723 lbs (1.235 kg)
Birth Weight [2]  55 grams
Diet [3]  Carnivore (Invertebrates), Carnivore (Vertebrates), Frugivore
Diet - Endothermic [3]  10 %
Diet - Fruit [3]  70 %
Diet - Invertibrates [3]  20 %
Forages - Arboreal [3]  100 %
Female Maturity [2]  1 year 10 months
Male Maturity [2]  1 year 7 months

Ecoregions

Protected Areas

Biodiversity Hotspots

Name Location Endemic Species Website
Mesoamerica Belize, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama No
Tropical Andes Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, Venezuela No
Tumbes-Choco-Magdalena Colombia, Ecuador, Panama, Peru No

Prey / Diet

Prey / Diet Overlap

Predators

Homo sapiens (man)[5]
Panthera onca (Jaguar)[5]

Consumers

Parasitized by 
Jellisonia johnsonae[6]
Plusaetis dolens dolens[6]
Rhopalopsyllus lugubris lugubris[6]

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

    Maps
Institution Infraspecies / Breed 
Fundacion Zoologica de Cali
Parque Zoologico Huachipa

Range Map

Distribution

Middle America; South America;

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1Myers, P., R. Espinosa, C. S. Parr, T. Jones, G. S. Hammond, and T. A. Dewey. 2006. The Animal Diversity Web (online). Accessed February 01, 2010 at animaldiversity.org
2de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774
3Hamish Wilman, Jonathan Belmaker, Jennifer Simpson, Carolina de la Rosa, Marcelo M. Rivadeneira, and Walter Jetz. 2014. EltonTraits 1.0: Species-level foraging attributes of the world's birds and mammals. Ecology 95:2027
4Kays, RW 2000. The behavior and ecology of olingos (Bassaricyon gabbii) and their competition with kinkajous (Potos flavus) in central Panama Mammalia 64:1–10
5Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
6International Flea Database
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Protected Areas provided by Biological Inventories of the World's Protected Areas in cooperation between the Information Center for the Environment at the University of California, Davis and numerous collaborators.
Le Saout, S., Hoffmann, M., Shi, Y., Hughes, A., Bernard, C., Brooks, T.M., Bertzky, B., Butchart, S.H.M., Stuart, S.N., Badman, T. & Rodrigues, A.S.L. (2013) Protected areas and effective biodiversity conservation. Science, 342, 803–805
Biodiversity Hotspots provided by Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License