Animalia > Chordata > Mammalia > Carnivora > Procyonidae > Potos > Potos flavus
 

Potos flavus (Kinkajou)

Wikipedia Abstract

The kinkajou (Potos flavus) is a rainforest mammal of the family Procyonidae related to olingos, coatis, raccoons, and the ringtail and cacomistle. It is the only member of the genus Potos and is also known as the "honey bear" (a name that it shares with the sun bear). Kinkajous may be mistaken for ferrets or monkeys, but are not closely related to either. Native to Central America and South America, this mostly frugivorous, arboreal mammal is not an endangered species, though it is seldom seen by people because of its strict nocturnal habits. However, they are hunted for the pet trade, for their fur (to make wallets and horse saddles) and for their meat. The species has been included in Appendix III of CITES by Honduras, which means that exports from Honduras require an export permit and
View Wikipedia Record: Potos flavus

Infraspecies

EDGE Analysis

Uniqueness Scale: Similiar (0) 
9
 Unique (100)
Uniqueness & Vulnerability Scale: Similiar & Secure (0) 
34
 Unique & Vulnerable (100)
ED Score: 18.54
EDGE Score: 2.97

Attributes

Arboreal [1]  Yes
Gestation [2]  3 months 25 days
Litter Size [2]  1
Litters / Year [2]  1
Maximum Longevity [2]  38 years
Nocturnal [1]  Yes
Weaning [2]  3 months 29 days
Adult Weight [2]  6.614 lbs (3.00 kg)
Birth Weight [2]  175 grams
Diet [3]  Carnivore (Invertebrates), Carnivore (Vertebrates), Frugivore
Diet - Fruit [3]  80 %
Diet - Invertibrates [3]  10 %
Diet - Vertibrates [3]  10 %
Forages - Arboreal [3]  100 %
Female Maturity [2]  2 years 3 months
Male Maturity [2]  1 year 6 months

Ecoregions

Protected Areas

Biodiversity Hotspots

Prey / Diet

Prey / Diet Overlap

Predators

Harpia harpyja (Harpy Eagle)[6]
Spizaetus isidori (Black-and-chestnut Eagle)[6]
Spizaetus ornatus (Ornate Hawk-Eagle)[8]

Consumers

Parasitized by 
Baylisascaris procyonis[6]
Molineus paraensis <Unverified Name>[9]
Plusaetis soberoni[10]
Trypanosoma cruzi[6]

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

Range Map

Distribution

Middle America; Patfa Valley dry forests; South America;

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1Myers, P., R. Espinosa, C. S. Parr, T. Jones, G. S. Hammond, and T. A. Dewey. 2006. The Animal Diversity Web (online). Accessed February 01, 2010 at animaldiversity.org
2de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774
3Hamish Wilman, Jonathan Belmaker, Jennifer Simpson, Carolina de la Rosa, Marcelo M. Rivadeneira, and Walter Jetz. 2014. EltonTraits 1.0: Species-level foraging attributes of the world's birds and mammals. Ecology 95:2027
4Phenology, seed dispersal, and recruitment in Cecropia peltata (Moraceae) in Cost Rican tropical dry forest, Theodore H. Fleming and Charles F. Williams, Journal of Tropical Ecology (1990) 6:163-178
5"Fig-eating by vertebrate frugivores: a global review", MIKE SHANAHAN, SAMSON SO, STEPHEN G. COMPTON and RICHARD CORLETT, Biol. Rev. (2001), 76, pp. 529–572
6Potos flavus, Linda S. Ford and Robert S. Hoffman, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 321, pp. 1-9 (1988)
7Howe, HF, EW Schupp, and LC Westley. 1985. Early consequences of seed dispersal for a Neotropical tree (Virola surinamensis) Ecology 66:781-791
8del Hoyo, J., Elliott, A., Sargatal, J., Christie, D.A. & de Juana, E. (eds.). Handbook of the Birds of the World Alive. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.
9Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
10International Flea Database
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Biodiversity Hotspots provided by Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License