Animalia > Chordata > Mammalia > Carnivora > Phocidae > Pagophilus > Pagophilus groenlandicus
 

Pagophilus groenlandicus (Harp Seal)

Synonyms: Pagophilus groenlandicus groenlandicus; Pagophilus groenlandicus oceanicus; Phoca groenlandica

Wikipedia Abstract

The harp seal or saddleback seal (Pagophilus groenlandicus) is a species of earless seal native to the northernmost Atlantic Ocean and parts of the Arctic Ocean. It now belongs to the monotypic genus Pagophilus. Its scientific name means "ice-lover from Greenland", and its synonym, Phoca groenlandica means "Greenland seal". Originally in the genus Phoca with a number of other species, it has since been reclassified into its own genus Pagophilus.
View Wikipedia Record: Pagophilus groenlandicus

EDGE Analysis

Uniqueness Scale: Similiar (0) 
4
 Unique (100)
Uniqueness & Vulnerability Scale: Similiar & Secure (0) 
24
 Unique & Vulnerable (100)
ED Score: 9.39
EDGE Score: 2.34

Attributes

Gestation [2]  7 months 18 days
Litter Size [2]  1
Litters / Year [4]  1
Maximum Longevity [4]  42 years
Migration [1]  Interoceanic
Snout to Vent Length [4]  5.773 feet (176 cm)
Water Biome [1]  Coastal
Weaning [2]  12 days
Adult Weight [2]  396.834 lbs (180.00 kg)
Birth Weight [2]  19.18 lbs (8.70 kg)
Diet [3]  Carnivore (Invertebrates), Piscivore
Diet - Fish [3]  60 %
Diet - Invertibrates [3]  40 %
Forages - Marine [3]  100 %
Female Maturity [2]  4 years 5 months
Male Maturity [2]  5 years

Protected Areas

Prey / Diet

Prey / Diet Overlap

Predators

Odobenus rosmarus (Walrus)[5]
Orcinus orca (Killer Whale)[5]
Somniosus microcephalus (gray shark)[5]
Ursus maritimus (Polar Bear)[8]

Consumers

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

    Maps
Institution Infraspecies / Breed 
Aquarium du Quebec
Detroit Zoological Society

Range Map

Distribution

North America;

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1Myers, P., R. Espinosa, C. S. Parr, T. Jones, G. S. Hammond, and T. A. Dewey. 2006. The Animal Diversity Web (online). Accessed February 01, 2010 at animaldiversity.org
2de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774
3Hamish Wilman, Jonathan Belmaker, Jennifer Simpson, Carolina de la Rosa, Marcelo M. Rivadeneira, and Walter Jetz. 2014. EltonTraits 1.0: Species-level foraging attributes of the world's birds and mammals. Ecology 95:2027
4Nathan P. Myhrvold, Elita Baldridge, Benjamin Chan, Dhileep Sivam, Daniel L. Freeman, and S. K. Morgan Ernest. 2015. An amniote life-history database to perform comparative analyses with birds, mammals, and reptiles. Ecology 96:3109
5Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
6Diet of Harp Seals (Phoca groenlandica) in Divisions 2J and 3KL During 1991–93, J. W. Lawson, G. B. Stenson and D. G. McKinnon, NAFO Sci. Coun. Studies, 21: 143–154 (1994)
7CephBase - Cephalopod (Octopus, Squid, Cuttlefish and Nautilus) Database
8Diet composition of polar bears in Svalbard and the western Barents Sea, Andrew E. Derocher, Øystein Wiig, Magnus Andersen, Polar Biol (2002) 25: 448–452
9Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
10Nunn, C. L., and S. Altizer. 2005. The Global Mammal Parasite Database: An Online Resource for Infectious Disease Records in Wild Primates. Evolutionary Anthroplogy 14:1-2.
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License