Animalia > Chordata > Mammalia > Perissodactyla > Tapiridae > Acrocodia > Acrocodia indica
 

Acrocodia indica (Malayan tapir; Asian tapir)

Synonyms: Tapirus indicus; Tapirus indicus brevetianus; Tapirus indicus indicus

Wikipedia Abstract

The Malayan tapir (Tapirus indicus), also called the Asian tapir, is the largest of the five species of tapir and the only one native to Asia. The scientific name refers to the East Indies, the species' natural habitat. In the Malay language, the tapir is commonly referred to as cipan, tenuk or badak tampung.
View Wikipedia Record: Acrocodia indica

Endangered Species

Status: Endangered
View IUCN Record: Acrocodia indica

EDGE Analysis

The Asian, or Malayan, tapir is the largest and most evolutionarily distinct of the four living species of tapir. It is also the only surviving Old World species. It is characterised by its long, fleshy, prehensile nose and distinctive black and white colouration which apparently breaks up the outline of the body in the gloom of the forests in which it lives. Formerly ranging across Southeast Asia, the tapir today exists as a series of isolated populations, the largest of which are in Malaysia. Habitat destruction is largely responsible for historical declines of this species, and continues to be the main threat today. Hunting, a relatively minor threat in the past, is also becoming more of a concern; as other preferred prey species are becoming more depleted hunters are increasingly looking towards tapirs as a food source.
Uniqueness Scale: Similiar (0) 
19
 Unique (100)
Uniqueness & Vulnerability Scale: Similiar & Secure (0) 
77
 Unique & Vulnerable (100)
ED Score: 38.62
EDGE Score: 5.76
View EDGE Record: Acrocodia indica

Attributes

Adult Weight [1]  551.159 lbs (250.00 kg)
Birth Weight [1]  14.33 lbs (6.50 kg)
Diet [2]  Herbivore
Diet - Plants [2]  100 %
Forages - Ground [2]  100 %
Female Maturity [1]  3 years
Male Maturity [1]  3 years
Gestation [1]  1 year
Litter Size [1]  1
Litters / Year [1]  1
Maximum Longevity [1]  37 years
Nocturnal [2]  Yes
Weaning [1]  6 months 3 days

Ecoregions

Protected Areas

Biodiversity Hotspots

Name Location Endemic Species Website
Indo-Burma Bangladesh, Cambodia, China, India, Laos, Myanmar, Thailand, Viet Nam No
Sundaland Brunei Darussalam, Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, Thailand No

Consumers

Parasitized by 
Dermacentor steini[3]
Paranoplocephala indica <Unverified Name>[4]

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

Range Map

Distribution

Southern Asia;

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774
2Hamish Wilman, Jonathan Belmaker, Jennifer Simpson, Carolina de la Rosa, Marcelo M. Rivadeneira, and Walter Jetz. 2014. EltonTraits 1.0: Species-level foraging attributes of the world's birds and mammals. Ecology 95:2027
3Nunn, C. L., and S. Altizer. 2005. The Global Mammal Parasite Database: An Online Resource for Infectious Disease Records in Wild Primates. Evolutionary Anthroplogy 14:1-2.
4Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Protected Areas provided by Biological Inventories of the World's Protected Areas in cooperation between the Information Center for the Environment at the University of California, Davis and numerous collaborators.
Le Saout, S., Hoffmann, M., Shi, Y., Hughes, A., Bernard, C., Brooks, T.M., Bertzky, B., Butchart, S.H.M., Stuart, S.N., Badman, T. & Rodrigues, A.S.L. (2013) Protected areas and effective biodiversity conservation. Science, 342, 803–805
Biodiversity Hotspots provided by Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License