Animalia > Chordata > Mammalia > Perissodactyla > Rhinocerotidae > Diceros > Diceros bicornis
 

Diceros bicornis (black rhinoceros)

Wikipedia Abstract

The black rhinoceros or hook-lipped rhinoceros (Diceros bicornis) is a species of rhinoceros, native to eastern and southern Africa including Botswana, Kenya, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, South Africa, Swaziland, Tanzania, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. Although the rhinoceros is referred to as black, its colors vary from brown to grey. The species overall is classified as critically endangered, and three subspecies, one including the western black rhinoceros, were declared extinct by the IUCN in 2011.
View Wikipedia Record: Diceros bicornis

Infraspecies

Endangered Species

Status: Critically Endangered
View IUCN Record: Diceros bicornis

EDGE Analysis

Black rhinos and white rhinos are not named for their colours, but for the shape of their lips. The black rhino has a prehensile (or grasping) upper lip, which it uses to draw plant material into its mouth. This two-horned rhinoceros has a reputation for being unpredictable and dangerous. As a result it has suffered much more persecution than other rhinos. The total population decreased by a massive 96% between 1970 and 1992, the largest decline of any of the rhino species. Four subspecies are recognised, of which three are considered Critically Endangered.
Uniqueness Scale: Similiar (0) 
13
 Unique (100)
Uniqueness & Vulnerability Scale: Similiar & Secure (0) 
83
 Unique & Vulnerable (100)
ED Score: 27.18
EDGE Score: 6.11
View EDGE Record: Diceros bicornis

Attributes

Adult Weight [1]  1.213 tons (1,100.00 kg)
Birth Weight [1]  80.469 lbs (36.50 kg)
Diet [2]  Herbivore
Diet - Plants [2]  100 %
Forages - Ground [2]  100 %
Female Maturity [1]  5 years
Male Maturity [1]  6 years 2 months
Gestation [1]  1 year 3 months
Litter Size [1]  1
Litters / Year [1]  0.4
Maximum Longevity [1]  49 years
Weaning [1]  1 year 8 months

Ecoregions

Protected Areas

Biodiversity Hotspots

Name Location Endemic Species Website
Cape Floristic Region South Africa No
Coastal Forests of Eastern Africa Kenya, Mozambique, Somalia, Tanzania No
Horn of Africa Djibouti, Ethiopia, Eritrea, Kenya, Oman, Somalia, Yemen No
Maputaland-Pondoland-Albany Mozambique, South Africa, Swaziland No
Succulent Karoo Namibia, South Africa No

Emblem of

Lesotho

Prey / Diet

Prey / Diet Overlap

Consumers

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

Range Map

Distribution

Africa;

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774
2Hamish Wilman, Jonathan Belmaker, Jennifer Simpson, Carolina de la Rosa, Marcelo M. Rivadeneira, and Walter Jetz. 2014. EltonTraits 1.0: Species-level foraging attributes of the world's birds and mammals. Ecology 95:2027
3NUTRIENT COMPOSITION OF PLANTS MOST FAVOURED BY BLACK RHINOCEROS (DICEROS BICORNIS) IN THE WILD, K. GHEBREMESKEL, G. WILLIAMS, R. A. BRETT, R. BUREK and L. S. HARBIGE, Comp. Biochem. Physiol. Vol. 98A, No. 3/4, pp. 529-534, 1991
4A RECORD OF FRUITS AND SEEDS DISPERSED BY MAMMALS AND BIRDS FROM SINGIDA DISTRICT OF TANGANYIKA TERRITORY, B. D. BURTT, Journal of Ecology Vol. 17, No. 2, pp. 351-355 (1929)
5Nunn, C. L., and S. Altizer. 2005. The Global Mammal Parasite Database: An Online Resource for Infectious Disease Records in Wild Primates. Evolutionary Anthroplogy 14:1-2.
6Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Biodiversity Hotspots provided by Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License