Animalia > Chordata > Mammalia > Artiodactyla > Camelidae > Camelus > Camelus dromedarius
 

Camelus dromedarius (dromedary)

Synonyms: Camelus ferus

Wikipedia Abstract

The dromedary (/ˈdrɒmədɛri/ or /-ədri/), also called the Arabian camel (Camelus dromedarius), is a large, even-toed ungulate with one hump on its back. The dromedary is the smallest of the three species of camel; adult males stand 1.8–2 m (5.9–6.6 ft) at the shoulder, while females are 1.7–1.9 m (5.6–6.2 ft) tall. Males typically weigh between 400 and 600 kg (880 and 1,320 lb), and females weigh between 300 and 540 kg (660 and 1,190 lb). The species' distinctive features include its long, curved neck, narrow chest, a single hump (compared with two on the Bactrian camel and wild Bactrian camel), and long hairs on the throat, shoulders and hump. The coat is generally a shade of brown. The hump, 20 cm (7.9 in) tall or more, is made of fat bound together by fibrous tissue.
View Wikipedia Record: Camelus dromedarius

EDGE Analysis

Uniqueness Scale: Similiar (0) 
13
 Unique (100)
Uniqueness & Vulnerability Scale: Similiar & Secure (0) 
-1
 Unique & Vulnerable (100)
ED Score: 26.05

Attributes

Adult Weight [1]  956.811 lbs (434.00 kg)
Birth Weight [1]  81.571 lbs (37.00 kg)
Diet [2]  Herbivore
Diet - Plants [2]  100 %
Forages - Ground [2]  100 %
Female Maturity [1]  3 years
Male Maturity [1]  6 years
Gestation [1]  1 year 1 month
Litter Size [1]  1
Litters / Year [1]  1
Maximum Longevity [1]  28 years
Weaning [1]  1 year 4 months

Protected Areas

Name IUCN Category Area acres Location Species Website Climate Land Use
Azraq Wetland Reserve IV   Jordan
Purnululu National Park II 604999 Western Australia, Australia
Uluru - Kata Tjuta National Park II 332429 Northern Territory, Australia

Emblem of

Eritrea
Jordan
Kuwait

Prey / Diet

Prey / Diet Overlap

Consumers

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

Distribution

Africa; Australia; Europe & Northern Asia (excluding China); Southern Asia;

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774
2Hamish Wilman, Jonathan Belmaker, Jennifer Simpson, Carolina de la Rosa, Marcelo M. Rivadeneira, and Walter Jetz. 2014. EltonTraits 1.0: Species-level foraging attributes of the world's birds and mammals. Ecology 95:2027
3Camelus dromedarius, Ilse U. Köhler-Rollefson, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 375, pp. 1-8 (1991)
4FEEDING BEHAVIOUR OF CAMEL REVIEW, Arshad Iqbal & Bakht Baidar Khan, Pak. J. Agri. Sei. Vol. 38 (3-4), 2001, p. 58-63
5Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
6Species Interactions of Australia Database, Atlas of Living Australia, Version ala-csv-2012-11-19
7International Flea Database
8Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License