Animalia > Chordata > Mammalia > Artiodactyla > Cervidae > Rusa > Rusa unicolor
 

Rusa unicolor (sambar)

Synonyms: Cervus unicolor

Wikipedia Abstract

The sambar (Rusa unicolor) is a large deer native to the Indian subcontinent, southern China and Southeast Asia. Although it primarily refers to R. unicolor, the name "sambar" is also sometimes used to refer to the Philippine deer (called the "Philippine sambar") and the Javan rusa (called the "Sunda sambar"). The name is also spelled sambur, or sambhur.
View Wikipedia Record: Rusa unicolor

Infraspecies

Attributes

Adult Weight [1]  407.857 lbs (185.00 kg)
Birth Weight [1]  22.046 lbs (10.00 kg)
Diet [2]  Frugivore, Herbivore
Diet - Fruit [2]  10 %
Diet - Plants [2]  90 %
Forages - Ground [2]  100 %
Female Maturity [1]  1 year 9 months
Gestation [1]  7 months 22 days
Litter Size [1]  1
Litters / Year [1]  1
Maximum Longevity [1]  26 years
Weaning [1]  7 months 3 days

Protected Areas

Prey / Diet

Prey / Diet Overlap

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Predators

Consumers

Distribution

Australia; Southern Asia;

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774
2Hamish Wilman, Jonathan Belmaker, Jennifer Simpson, Carolina de la Rosa, Marcelo M. Rivadeneira, and Walter Jetz. 2014. EltonTraits 1.0: Species-level foraging attributes of the world's birds and mammals. Ecology 95:2027
3Food habits of ungulates in dry tropical forests of Gir Lion Sanctuary, Gujarat, India, Jamal A. KHAN, Acta Theriologica 39 (2): 185-193,1994.
4Rusa unicolor (Artiodactyla: Cervidae), DAVID M. LESLIE, JR., MAMMALIAN SPECIES 43(871):1–30 (2011)
5"Fig-eating by vertebrate frugivores: a global review", MIKE SHANAHAN, SAMSON SO, STEPHEN G. COMPTON and RICHARD CORLETT, Biol. Rev. (2001), 76, pp. 529–572
6Frugivory of Phyllanthus emblica at Rajaji National Park, northwest India, SOUMYA PRASAD, RAVI CHELLAM, JAGDISH KRISHNASWAMY, S. P. GOYAL, CURRENT SCIENCE, VOL. 87, NO. 9, 10 NOVEMBER 2004
7Cuon alpinus, James A. Cohen, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 100, pp. 1-3 (1978)
8Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
9Nunn, C. L., and S. Altizer. 2005. The Global Mammal Parasite Database: An Online Resource for Infectious Disease Records in Wild Primates. Evolutionary Anthroplogy 14:1-2.
10Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
11Species Interactions of Australia Database, Atlas of Living Australia, Version ala-csv-2012-11-19
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