Animalia > Chordata > Mammalia > Artiodactyla > Cervidae > Muntiacus > Muntiacus muntjak
 

Muntiacus muntjak (Indian muntjac)

Wikipedia Abstract

The Indian muntjac (Muntiacus muntjak), also called red muntjac and barking deer, is a common muntjac deer species in South and Southeast Asia. It is listed as Least Concern on the IUCN Red List. It has soft, short, brownish or greyish hair, sometimes with creamy markings. This species is omnivorous, feeding on grass,fruits, shoots, seeds, birds' eggs as well as small animals. It sometimes displays even scavenging behavior, feeding on carrion. It gives calls similar to barking, usually upon sensing a predator (hence the common name for all muntjacs of barking deer).
View Wikipedia Record: Muntiacus muntjak

Infraspecies

EDGE Analysis

Uniqueness Scale: Similiar (0) 
2
 Unique (100)
Uniqueness & Vulnerability Scale: Similiar & Secure (0) 
16
 Unique & Vulnerable (100)
ED Score: 5.15
EDGE Score: 1.82

Attributes

Adult Weight [1]  46.297 lbs (21.00 kg)
Birth Weight [1]  2.696 lbs (1.223 kg)
Diet [2]  Frugivore, Herbivore
Diet - Fruit [2]  30 %
Diet - Plants [2]  70 %
Forages - Ground [2]  100 %
Female Maturity [1]  9 months 2 days
Male Maturity [1]  11 months 2 days
Gestation [1]  7 months
Litter Size [1]  1
Maximum Longevity [1]  19 years
Weaning [1]  61 days

Ecoregions

Protected Areas

+ Click for partial list (100)Full list (107)

Biodiversity Hotspots

Name Location Endemic Species Website
Himalaya Bhutan, China, India, Myanmar, Nepal, Pakistan No
Indo-Burma Bangladesh, Cambodia, China, India, Laos, Myanmar, Thailand, Viet Nam No
Mountains of Southwest China China, Myanmar No
Sundaland Brunei Darussalam, Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, Thailand No
Western Ghats and Sri Lanka India, Sri Lanka No

Prey / Diet

Ficus altissima (false banyan)[3]
Ficus benjamina (weeping fig)[3]
Ficus minahassae (clustertree)[3]
Phyllanthus emblica (emblic)[4]

Prey / Diet Overlap

+ Click for partial list (43)Full list (135)

Predators

Bubo nipalensis (Spot-bellied Eagle-Owl)[5]

Consumers

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

Range Map

Distribution

Doi Chiang Dao Wildlife Sanctuary; Nam Kong National Biodiversity Conservation Area; Namdapha National Park; Southern Asia;

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774
2Hamish Wilman, Jonathan Belmaker, Jennifer Simpson, Carolina de la Rosa, Marcelo M. Rivadeneira, and Walter Jetz. 2014. EltonTraits 1.0: Species-level foraging attributes of the world's birds and mammals. Ecology 95:2027
3"Fig-eating by vertebrate frugivores: a global review", MIKE SHANAHAN, SAMSON SO, STEPHEN G. COMPTON and RICHARD CORLETT, Biol. Rev. (2001), 76, pp. 529–572
4Frugivory of Phyllanthus emblica at Rajaji National Park, northwest India, SOUMYA PRASAD, RAVI CHELLAM, JAGDISH KRISHNASWAMY, S. P. GOYAL, CURRENT SCIENCE, VOL. 87, NO. 9, 10 NOVEMBER 2004
5Predation by Forest Eagle-Owl Bubo nipalensis on Mouse Deer Moschiola meminna, Nandini R, Indian Birds Vol. 1 No. 5 (September-October 2005), p. 119-120
6International Flea Database
7Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
8Nunn, C. L., and S. Altizer. 2005. The Global Mammal Parasite Database: An Online Resource for Infectious Disease Records in Wild Primates. Evolutionary Anthroplogy 14:1-2.
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Protected Areas provided by Biological Inventories of the World's Protected Areas in cooperation between the Information Center for the Environment at the University of California, Davis and numerous collaborators.
Le Saout, S., Hoffmann, M., Shi, Y., Hughes, A., Bernard, C., Brooks, T.M., Bertzky, B., Butchart, S.H.M., Stuart, S.N., Badman, T. & Rodrigues, A.S.L. (2013) Protected areas and effective biodiversity conservation. Science, 342, 803–805
Biodiversity Hotspots provided by Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License