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Addax nasomaculatus (addax)

Wikipedia Abstract

The addax (Addax nasomaculatus), also known as the white antelope and the screwhorn antelope, is an antelope of the genus Addax, that lives in the Sahara desert. It was first described by Henri de Blainville in 1816. As suggested by its alternative name, this pale antelope has long, twisted horns - typically 55 to 80 cm (22 to 31 in) in females and 70 to 85 cm (28 to 33 in) in males. Males stand from 105 to 115 cm (41 to 45 in) at the shoulder, with females at 95 to 110 cm (37 to 43 in). They are sexually dimorphic, as the females are smaller than males. The colour of the coat depends on the season - in the winter, it is greyish-brown with white hindquarters and legs, and long, brown hair on the head, neck, and shoulders; in the summer, the coat turns almost completely white or sandy blond
View Wikipedia Record: Addax nasomaculatus

Endangered Species

Status: Critically Endangered
View IUCN Record: Addax nasomaculatus

EDGE Analysis

Uniqueness Scale: Similiar (0) 
3
 Unique (100)
Uniqueness & Vulnerability Scale: Similiar & Secure (0) 
65
 Unique & Vulnerable (100)
ED Score: 7.92
EDGE Score: 4.96

Attributes

Adult Weight [1]  206.133 lbs (93.50 kg)
Birth Weight [2]  12.346 lbs (5.60 kg)
Female Weight [1]  165.348 lbs (75.00 kg)
Male Weight [1]  246.919 lbs (112.00 kg)
Weight Dimorphism [1]  49.3 %
Diet [3]  Herbivore
Diet - Plants [3]  100 %
Forages - Ground [3]  100 %
Female Maturity [2]  2 years 11 months
Gestation [2]  9 months 12 days
Litter Size [2]  1
Litters / Year [2]  1
Maximum Longevity [2]  28 years
Migration [4]  Intracontinental
Nocturnal [3]  Yes
Weaning [2]  6 months 18 days

Ecoregions

Name Countries Ecozone Biome Species Report Climate Land
Use
North Saharan steppe and woodlands Egypt, Libya, Algeria, Tunisia, Morocco, Western Sahara, Mauritania Palearctic Deserts and Xeric Shrublands
Sahara desert Egypt, Sudan, Libya, Algeria, Mauritania, Mali, Chad, Niger Palearctic Deserts and Xeric Shrublands
South Saharan steppe and woodlands Mauritania, Mali, Algeria, Niger, Chad, Sudan Palearctic Deserts and Xeric Shrublands
Tibesti-Jebel Uweinat montane xeric woodlands Chad, Libya Palearctic Deserts and Xeric Shrublands
West Saharan montane xeric woodlands Algeria, Niger, Mali, Mauritania Palearctic Deserts and Xeric Shrublands

Protected Areas

Name IUCN Category Area acres Location Species Website Climate Land Use
Azraq Wetland Reserve IV   Jordan
Souss-Massa National Park 132969 Morocco  
Tassili N'Ajjer National Park II 24545308 Algeria  
Termit et de Tin Toumma National Nature Reserve 23969222 Niger      

Predators

Consumers

Parasitized by 
Haemonchus contortus (red stomach worm)[5]
Longistrongylus curvispiculum[5]

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

Range Map

Distribution

Africa;

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1Addax nasomaculatus, Paul R. Krausman and Anne L. Casey, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 807, pp. 1-4 (2007)
2de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774
3Hamish Wilman, Jonathan Belmaker, Jennifer Simpson, Carolina de la Rosa, Marcelo M. Rivadeneira, and Walter Jetz. 2014. EltonTraits 1.0: Species-level foraging attributes of the world's birds and mammals. Ecology 95:2027
4Myers, P., R. Espinosa, C. S. Parr, T. Jones, G. S. Hammond, and T. A. Dewey. 2006. The Animal Diversity Web (online). Accessed February 01, 2010 at animaldiversity.org
5Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Protected Areas provided by Biological Inventories of the World's Protected Areas in cooperation between the Information Center for the Environment at the University of California, Davis and numerous collaborators.
Le Saout, S., Hoffmann, M., Shi, Y., Hughes, A., Bernard, C., Brooks, T.M., Bertzky, B., Butchart, S.H.M., Stuart, S.N., Badman, T. & Rodrigues, A.S.L. (2013) Protected areas and effective biodiversity conservation. Science, 342, 803–805
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Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License