Animalia > Chordata > Mammalia > Chiroptera > Pteropodidae > Cynopterus > Cynopterus sphinx
 

Cynopterus sphinx (greater short-nosed fruit bat)

Wikipedia Abstract

The greater short-nosed fruit bat or short-nosed Indian fruit bat (Cynopterus sphinx) is a species of megabat in the family Pteropodidae. It is found in South and Southeast Asia, where it is known as තල වවුලා (thala wawulaa) by Sinhalese people in Sri Lanka.
View Wikipedia Record: Cynopterus sphinx

Infraspecies

EDGE Analysis

Uniqueness Scale: Similiar (0) 
4
 Unique (100)
Uniqueness & Vulnerability Scale: Similiar & Secure (0) 
24
 Unique & Vulnerable (100)
ED Score: 8.84
EDGE Score: 2.29

Attributes

Adult Weight [1]  75 grams
Birth Weight [1]  11 grams
Diet [2]  Frugivore
Diet - Fruit [2]  100 %
Forages - Arboreal [2]  100 %
Female Maturity [1]  5 months
Male Maturity [1]  1 year 5 months
Gestation [1]  4 months
Litter Size [1]  1
Litters / Year [1]  2
Maximum Longevity [1]  10 years
Nocturnal [2]  Yes
Weaning [1]  42 days
Wing Span [3]  18 inches (.468 m)

Ecoregions

Protected Areas

Biodiversity Hotspots

Name Location Endemic Species Website
Himalaya Bhutan, China, India, Myanmar, Nepal, Pakistan No
Indo-Burma Bangladesh, Cambodia, China, India, Laos, Myanmar, Thailand, Viet Nam No
Mountains of Southwest China China, Myanmar No
Sundaland Brunei Darussalam, Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, Thailand No
Western Ghats and Sri Lanka India, Sri Lanka No

Prey / Diet

Prey / Diet Overlap

+ Click for partial list (51)Full list (244)

Predators

Bubo bubo bengalensis (Rock Eagle-owl)[9]

Providers

Consumers

Parasitized by 
Lagaropsylla micula[10]

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

    Maps
Institution Infraspecies / Breed 
Kadoorie Farm & Botanic Garden

Range Map

Distribution

Southern Asia;

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774
2Hamish Wilman, Jonathan Belmaker, Jennifer Simpson, Carolina de la Rosa, Marcelo M. Rivadeneira, and Walter Jetz. 2014. EltonTraits 1.0: Species-level foraging attributes of the world's birds and mammals. Ecology 95:2027
3Allometry of Bat Wings and Legs and Comparison with Bird Wings, Ulla M. Norberg, Phil. Trans. R. Soc. Lond. B 1981 292, 359-398
4Temporal patterns of resource use by the short-nosed fruit bat, Cynopterus sphinx (Megachiroptera: Pteropodidae), Elangovan, V | Marimuthu, G | Kunz, TH, Journal of Mammalogy [J. Mammal.]. Vol. 82, no. 1, pp. 161-165. 2001.
5Cynopterus sphinx, Jay F. Storz and Thomas H. Kunz, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 613, pp. 1-8 (1999)
6IDENTIFYING DIURNAL AND NOCTURNAL FRUGIVORES IN THE TERRESTRIAL AND ARBOREAL LAYERS OF A TROPICAL RAIN FOREST IN SRI LANKA, Palitha Jayasekara, Udayani Rose Weerasinghe, Siril Wijesundara & Seiki Takatsuki, ECOTROPICA 13: 7–15, 2007
7Folivory in Fruit-Eating Bats, with New Evidence from Artibeus jamaicensis (Chiroptera: Phyllostomidae), Thomas H. Kunz and Carlos A. Diaz, Biotropica, Vol. 27, No. 1 (Mar., 1995), pp. 106-120
8"Fig-eating by vertebrate frugivores: a global review", MIKE SHANAHAN, SAMSON SO, STEPHEN G. COMPTON and RICHARD CORLETT, Biol. Rev. (2001), 76, pp. 529–572
9Pande, S. & N. Dahanukar (2011). The diet of Indian Eagle Owl Bubo bengalensis and its agronomic significance. Journal of Threatened Taxa 3(8): 2011–2017.
10International Flea Database
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Biodiversity Hotspots provided by Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License