Animalia > Chordata > Mammalia > Chiroptera > Pteropodidae > Pteropus > Pteropus alecto
 

Pteropus alecto (black flying fox)

Synonyms: Pteropus banakrisi

Wikipedia Abstract

The black flying fox or black fruit bat (Pteropus alecto) is a bat in the family Pteropodidae. It is among the largest bats in the world, but is considerably smaller than the largest species in its genus, Pteropus. The black flying fox is native to Australia, Papua New Guinea, and Indonesia. It is not a threatened species.
View Wikipedia Record: Pteropus alecto

Infraspecies

EDGE Analysis

Uniqueness Scale: Similiar (0) 
2
 Unique (100)
Uniqueness & Vulnerability Scale: Similiar & Secure (0) 
15
 Unique & Vulnerable (100)
ED Score: 4.88
EDGE Score: 1.77

Attributes

Arboreal [1]  Yes
Litter Size [2]  1
Litters / Year [2]  1
Maximum Longevity [2]  20 years
Nocturnal [1]  Yes
Snout to Vent Length [4]  10 inches (25 cm)
Adult Weight [2]  1.482 lbs (672 g)
Diet [3]  Frugivore
Diet - Fruit [3]  100 %
Forages - Arboreal [3]  100 %

Ecoregions

Protected Areas

Biodiversity Hotspots

Name Location Endemic Species Website
Sundaland Brunei Darussalam, Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, Thailand No
Wallacea East Timor, Indonesia No

Prey / Diet

Prey / Diet Overlap

+ Click for partial list (15)Full list (114)

Consumers

Parasitized by 
Cyclopodia australis[7]
Toxocara pteropodis <Unverified Name>[8]

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

    Maps
Institution Infraspecies / Breed 
Territory Wildlife Park (Berry Springs

Range Map

Distribution

Australia; Southern Asia;

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1Myers, P., R. Espinosa, C. S. Parr, T. Jones, G. S. Hammond, and T. A. Dewey. 2006. The Animal Diversity Web (online). Accessed February 01, 2010 at animaldiversity.org
2de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774
3Hamish Wilman, Jonathan Belmaker, Jennifer Simpson, Carolina de la Rosa, Marcelo M. Rivadeneira, and Walter Jetz. 2014. EltonTraits 1.0: Species-level foraging attributes of the world's birds and mammals. Ecology 95:2027
4Nathan P. Myhrvold, Elita Baldridge, Benjamin Chan, Dhileep Sivam, Daniel L. Freeman, and S. K. Morgan Ernest. 2015. An amniote life-history database to perform comparative analyses with birds, mammals, and reptiles. Ecology 96:3109
5Folivory in Fruit-Eating Bats, with New Evidence from Artibeus jamaicensis (Chiroptera: Phyllostomidae), Thomas H. Kunz and Carlos A. Diaz, Biotropica, Vol. 27, No. 1 (Mar., 1995), pp. 106-120
6"Fig-eating by vertebrate frugivores: a global review", MIKE SHANAHAN, SAMSON SO, STEPHEN G. COMPTON and RICHARD CORLETT, Biol. Rev. (2001), 76, pp. 529–572
7Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
8Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Biodiversity Hotspots provided by Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License