Animalia > Chordata > Mammalia > Rodentia > Muroidea > Cricetidae > Myodes > Myodes glareolus
 

Myodes glareolus (Bank vole)

Synonyms:

Wikipedia Abstract

The bank vole (Myodes glareolus; formerly Clethrionomys glareolus) is a small vole with red-brown fur and some grey patches, with a tail about half as long as its body. A rodent, it lives in woodland areas and is around 100 millimetres (3.9 in) in length. The bank vole is found in western Europe and northern Asia. It is native to Great Britain but not to Ireland, where it has been accidentally introduced, and has now colonised much of the south and southwest.
View Wikipedia Record: Myodes glareolus

Attributes

Adult Weight [1]  21 grams
Birth Weight [1]  2 grams
Male Weight [3]  22 grams
Diet [2]  Carnivore (Invertebrates), Granivore, Herbivore
Diet - Invertibrates [2]  20 %
Diet - Plants [2]  50 %
Diet - Seeds [2]  30 %
Forages - Ground [2]  100 %
Female Maturity [1]  47 days
Male Maturity [1]  72 days
Gestation [1]  20 days
Litter Size [1]  4
Litters / Year [1]  3
Maximum Longevity [1]  5 years
Snout to Vent Length [3]  4.331 inches (11 cm)
Weaning [1]  20 days

Ecoregions

Protected Areas

Ecosystems

Biodiversity Hotspots

Name Location Endemic Species Website
Mediterranean Basin Algeria, Egypt, France, Greece, Israel, Jordan, Lebanon, Libya, Portugal, Spain, Syria, Tunisia, Turkey No

Prey / Diet

Lasius niger (Black garden ant)[4]
Quercus robur (Pedunculate Oak)[4]

Prey / Diet Overlap

Predators

Consumers

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

    Maps
Institution Infraspecies / Breed 
Museum de Besancon
Parc Zoologique Fort Mardyck
Ranua Wildlife Park

Distribution

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774
2Hamish Wilman, Jonathan Belmaker, Jennifer Simpson, Carolina de la Rosa, Marcelo M. Rivadeneira, and Walter Jetz. 2014. EltonTraits 1.0: Species-level foraging attributes of the world's birds and mammals. Ecology 95:2027
3Nathan P. Myhrvold, Elita Baldridge, Benjamin Chan, Dhileep Sivam, Daniel L. Freeman, and S. K. Morgan Ernest. 2015. An amniote life-history database to perform comparative analyses with birds, mammals, and reptiles. Ecology 96:3109
4Ecology of Commanster
5Prey choice of Tengmalm's owls (Aegolius funereus funereus): preference for substandard individuals?, Vesa Koivunen, Erkki Korpimäki, Harri Hakkarainen, and Kai Norrdahl, Can. J. Zool. 74: 816-823 (1996)
6Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
7Food habits of Zamenis longissimus (Laurenti, 1768) (Reptilia: Serpentes: Colubridae) in Bieszczady (south-eastern Poland), BARTŁOMIEJ NAJBAR, Vertebrate Zoology 57 (1) 2007, 73-77
8Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
9International Flea Database
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Protected Areas provided by Biological Inventories of the World's Protected Areas in cooperation between the Information Center for the Environment at the University of California, Davis and numerous collaborators.
Natura 2000, UK data: © Crown copyright and database right [2010] All rights reserved. Ordnance Survey Licence number 100017955
Biodiversity Hotspots provided by Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License