Animalia > Chordata > Aves > Strigiformes > Strigidae > Megascops > Megascops asio
 

Megascops asio (Eastern Screech-Owl; Eastern Screech Owl; petit-duc maculé; Tecolote oriental)

Wikipedia Abstract

The eastern screech owl or eastern screech-owl (Megascops asio) is a small owl that is relatively common in Eastern North America, from Mexico to Canada. This species is native to most wooded environments of its distribution and, more so than any other owl in its range, has adapted well to manmade development, although it frequently avoids detection due to its strictly nocturnal habits.
View Wikipedia Record: Megascops asio

Infraspecies

Megascops asio asio (Eastern screech owl)
Megascops asio floridanus (Eastern screech owl)
Megascops asio hasbroucki (Hasbrouck's screech owl)
Megascops asio maxwelliae (Rocky Mountain screech owl)
Megascops asio mccallii (Texas screen owl)

EDGE Analysis

Uniqueness Scale: Similiar (0) 
3
 Unique (100)
Uniqueness & Vulnerability Scale: Similiar & Secure (0) 
21
 Unique & Vulnerable (100)
ED Score: 7.49056
EDGE Score: 2.13896

Attributes

Adult Weight [1]  180 grams
Birth Weight [3]  11 grams
Female Weight [5]  184 grams
Male Weight [5]  160 grams
Weight Dimorphism [5]  15 %
Breeding Habitat [2]  Temperate eastern forests, Tropical dry forests
Wintering Geography [2]  Non-migrartory
Wintering Habitat [2]  Temperate eastern forests, Tropical dry forests
Diet [4]  Carnivore (Invertebrates), Carnivore (Vertebrates)
Diet - Invertibrates [4]  50 %
Diet - Vertibrates [4]  50 %
Forages - Mid-High [4]  10 %
Forages - Understory [4]  10 %
Forages - Ground [4]  70 %
Forages - Water Surface [4]  10 %
Clutch Size [6]  4
Clutches / Year [3]  1
Fledging [1]  28 days
Global Population (2017 est.) [2]  710,000
Incubation [3]  29 days
Maximum Longevity [3]  21 years
Nocturnal [4]  Yes
Snout to Vent Length [1]  8 inches (21 cm)
Female Maturity [3]  1 year
Male Maturity [3]  1 year

Ecoregions

Protected Areas

+ Click for partial list (100)Full list (121)

Prey / Diet

Prey / Diet Overlap

Predators

Consumers

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

Range Map

Distribution

Little River National Wildlife Refuge; Saint Croix International Historic Site;

External References

Audio

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Provided by Center for Biological Diversity via Myxer Author: Tony Phillips / SUNY Stony Brook

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1Nathan P. Myhrvold, Elita Baldridge, Benjamin Chan, Dhileep Sivam, Daniel L. Freeman, and S. K. Morgan Ernest. 2015. An amniote life-history database to perform comparative analyses with birds, mammals, and reptiles. Ecology 96:3109
2Partners in Flight Avian Conservation Assessment Database, version 2017. Accessed on January 2018.
3de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774
4Hamish Wilman, Jonathan Belmaker, Jennifer Simpson, Carolina de la Rosa, Marcelo M. Rivadeneira, and Walter Jetz. 2014. EltonTraits 1.0: Species-level foraging attributes of the world's birds and mammals. Ecology 95:2027
5Kemp, AC. 1989. Estimation of Biological Indices for Little-known African Owls Meyburg, B.-U & R. D. Chancellor eds. 1989 Raptors in the Modern World WWGBP: Berlin, London & Paris
6Jetz W, Sekercioglu CH, Böhning-Gaese K (2008) The Worldwide Variation in Avian Clutch Size across Species and Space PLoS Biol 6(12): e303. doi:10.1371/journal.pbio.0060303
7Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
8Blarina brevicauda, Sarah B. George, Jerry R. Choate, and Hugh H. Genoways, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 261, pp. 1-9 (1986)
9Blarina carolinensis, Timothy S. McCay, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 673, pp. 1–7 (2001)
10Myers, P., R. Espinosa, C. S. Parr, T. Jones, G. S. Hammond, and T. A. Dewey. 2006. The Animal Diversity Web (online). Accessed February 01, 2010 at animaldiversity.org
11Microtus pinetorum, Michael J. Smolen, Mammalian Species No. 147, pp. 1-7 (1981)
12Myotis sodalis, Christine E. Thomson, Mammalian Species No. 163, pp. 1-5 (1982)
13Napaeozapus insignis, John O. Whitaker, Jr., and Robert E. Wrigley, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 14, pp. 1-6 (1972)
14Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
15International Flea Database
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Protected Areas provided by Biological Inventories of the World's Protected Areas in cooperation between the Information Center for the Environment at the University of California, Davis and numerous collaborators.
Calvin College Ecosystem Preserve
Crosswinds Marsh, Wayne County, Michigan
Edwin S. George Reserve, University of Michigan, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
Tawas Point State Park
Western Michigan University’s Asylum Lake
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License
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