Animalia > Chordata > Aves > Strigiformes > Strigidae > Bubo > Bubo scandiacus
 

Bubo scandiacus (Snowy Owl; harfang des neiges)

Synonyms: Nyctea scandiaca

Attributes

Adult Weight [1]  4.502 lbs (2.042 kg)
Birth Weight [3]  45 grams
Female Weight [1]  5.024 lbs (2.279 kg)
Male Weight [1]  3.982 lbs (1.806 kg)
Weight Dimorphism [1]  26.2 %
Breeding Habitat [2]  Arctic tundra
Wintering Geography [2]  Northern U.S./Canada
Wintering Habitat [2]  Generalist, Agricultural
Female Maturity [3]  2 years
Male Maturity [3]  2 years
Clutch Size [4]  4
Clutches / Year [3]  1
Incubation [3]  32 days
Maximum Longevity [3]  28 years

Ecoregions

Protected Areas

+ Click for partial list (100)Full list (125)

Biodiversity Hotspots

Name Location Endemic Species Website
Mountains of Central Asia Afghanistan, China, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Uzbekistan No

Emblem of

Quebec

Prey / Diet

Prey / Diet Overlap

Predators

Haliaeetus leucocephalus (Bald Eagle)[5]
Homo sapiens (man)[5]

Consumers

Parasitized by 
Capillaria tenuissima <Unverified Name>[12]
Cyrnea longispicula <Unverified Name>[12]
Microtetrameres canadensis <Unverified Name>[12]

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

Range Map

Distribution

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1Kerlinger, P. & Lein, MR (1988) Causes of mortality, fat condition, and weights of wintering Snowy Owls. J. Field Orn. 59: 7–12
2Partners in Flight Avian Conservation Assessment Database, version 2017. Accessed on January 2018.
3de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774
4Jetz W, Sekercioglu CH, Böhning-Gaese K (2008) The Worldwide Variation in Avian Clutch Size across Species and Space PLoS Biol 6(12): e303. doi:10.1371/journal.pbio.0060303
5Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
6OLIVIER GILG1, BENOÎT SITTLER, AND ILKKA HANSKI, WILL COLLARED LEMMINGS AND THEIR PREDATORS BE THE FIRST VERTEBRATES TO “FALL OVER THE CLIFF” IN GREENLAND DUE TO GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGES? Gyrfalcons and Ptarmigan in a Changing World – Conference Proceedings 2011, p. 131-132
7Predator–prey relationships: arctic foxes and lemmings, Anders Angerbjorn, Magnus Tannerfeldt and Sam Erlinge, Journal of Animal Ecology, Volume 68, Issue 1, Pages 34-49
8Lepus arcticus, Troy L. Best and Travis Hill Henry, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 457, pp. 1-9 (1994)
9Mustela frenata, Steven R. Sheffield and Howard H. Thomas, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 570, pp. 1-9 (1997)
10Phenacomys ungava (Rodentia: Cricetidae), JANET K. BRAUN, SARA B. GONZALEZ-PEREZ, GARRETT M. STREET, JENNIE M. MOOK, AND NICHOLAS J. CZAPLEWSKI, MAMMALIAN SPECIES 45(899):18–29 (2013)
11Spermophilus richardsonii, Gail R. Michener and James W. Koeppl, Mammalian Species No. 243, pp. 1-8, (1985)
12Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Protected Areas provided by Biological Inventories of the World's Protected Areas in cooperation between the Information Center for the Environment at the University of California, Davis and numerous collaborators.
Natura 2000, UK data: © Crown copyright and database right [2010] All rights reserved. Ordnance Survey Licence number 100017955
Biodiversity Hotspots provided by Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund