Animalia > Chordata > Aves > Psittaciformes > Psittacidae > Diopsittaca > Diopsittaca nobilis
 

Diopsittaca nobilis (Red-shouldered Macaw)

Synonyms: Ara nobilis

Wikipedia Abstract

The red-shouldered macaw (Diopsittaca nobilis) is a small green South American parrot, a member of a large group of Neotropical parrots called macaws. The species is named for the red coverts on its wings. It is the smallest macaw, being 30–35 cm (12–14 in) in length. It is native to the tropical lowlands, savannah, and swamplands of Venezuela, the Guianas, Bolivia, Brazil, and far south-eastern Peru. It has two distinct subspecies, the noble macaw and the Hahn's macaw, and a possible poorly distinct third subspecies that has longer wings, but is otherwise similar to the noble macaw. Red-shouldered macaws are frequently bred in captivity for the pet trade, where they are sometimes described as mini-macaws.
View Wikipedia Record: Diopsittaca nobilis

Infraspecies

EDGE Analysis

Uniqueness Scale: Similiar (0) 
2
 Unique (100)
Uniqueness & Vulnerability Scale: Similiar & Secure (0) 
18
 Unique & Vulnerable (100)
ED Score: 5.92903
EDGE Score: 1.93572

Attributes

Adult Weight [1]  151 grams
Diet [2]  Frugivore, Granivore
Diet - Fruit [2]  50 %
Diet - Seeds [2]  50 %
Forages - Canopy [2]  20 %
Forages - Mid-High [2]  40 %
Forages - Understory [2]  20 %
Forages - Ground [2]  20 %
Clutch Size [3]  4
Fledging [1]  60 days
Incubation [1]  24 days
Maximum Longevity [4]  23 years

Ecoregions

Protected Areas

Name IUCN Category Area acres Location Species Website Climate Land Use
Estacion Biologica Beni Biosphere Reserve VI 335178 Bolivia  
Madidi National Park II 3194501 Bolivia  
Noel Kempff Mercado National Park II 4006523 Bolivia  
Ralleigh Falls - Voltzberg Nature Reserve 191114 Suriname  

Biodiversity Hotspots

Name Location Endemic Species Website
Atlantic Forest Argentina, Brazil, Paraguay, Uruguay No
Cerrado Brazil No

Prey / Diet

Combretum lanceolatum[5]
Erythrina fusca (bucayo)[6]
Terminalia argentea[6]

Prey / Diet Overlap

Consumers

Parasitized by 
Pelecitus helecinus <Unverified Name>[7]

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

Range Map

Distribution

South America;

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1Nathan P. Myhrvold, Elita Baldridge, Benjamin Chan, Dhileep Sivam, Daniel L. Freeman, and S. K. Morgan Ernest. 2015. An amniote life-history database to perform comparative analyses with birds, mammals, and reptiles. Ecology 96:3109
2Hamish Wilman, Jonathan Belmaker, Jennifer Simpson, Carolina de la Rosa, Marcelo M. Rivadeneira, and Walter Jetz. 2014. EltonTraits 1.0: Species-level foraging attributes of the world's birds and mammals. Ecology 95:2027
3Jetz W, Sekercioglu CH, Böhning-Gaese K (2008) The Worldwide Variation in Avian Clutch Size across Species and Space PLoS Biol 6(12): e303. doi:10.1371/journal.pbio.0060303
4de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774
5The sweet jelly of Combretum lanceolatum flowers (Combretaceae): a cornucopia resource for bird pollinators in the Pantanal, western Brazil, M. Sazima, S. Vogel, A. L. do Prado, D. M. de Oliveira, G. Franz, and I. Sazima, Plant Syst. Evol. 227: 195-208 (2001)
6del Hoyo, J., Elliott, A., Sargatal, J., Christie, D.A. & de Juana, E. (eds.). Handbook of the Birds of the World Alive. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.
7Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Biodiversity Hotspots provided by Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License