Animalia > Arthropoda > Insecta > Hymenoptera > Apoidea > Apidae > Bombus > Bombus fervidus
 

Bombus fervidus (Golden northern bumble bee)

Wikipedia Abstract

Bombus fervidus, the golden northern bumble bee or yellow bumblebee, is a species of bumblebee native to North America. It has a yellow-colored abdomen and thorax. Its range includes the North American continent, excluding much of Texas, Alaska, and the northern parts of Canada. It is common in cities and farmland, with populations concentrated in the North Eastern part of the United States. It is similar in color and range to the American bumblebee (Bombus pensylvanicus). It has complex behavioral traits, which include a communication system that involves dancing and a coordinated nest defense to ward off predators. B. fervidus is an important pollinator, so recent population decline is a particular concern.
View Wikipedia Record: Bombus fervidus

Attributes

Diet [1]  Herbivore
Hibernates [1]  Yes

Protected Areas

Name IUCN Category Area acres Location Species Website Climate Land Use
Edwin S. George Reserve 1297 Michigan, United States

Ecosystems

Prey / Diet

Prey / Diet Overlap

Predators

Consumers

Distribution

Middle America; North America;

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1Myers, P., R. Espinosa, C. S. Parr, T. Jones, G. S. Hammond, and T. A. Dewey. 2006. The Animal Diversity Web (online). Accessed February 01, 2010 at animaldiversity.org
2Study of Northern Virginia Ecology
3Predator-Prey Database for the family Asilidae (Hexapoda: Diptera) Prepared by Dr. Robert Lavigne, Professor Emeritus, University of Wyoming, USA and Dr. Jason Londt (Natal Museum, Pietermaritzburg)
4Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
5Clements, R. E., and F. L. Long. 1923, Experimental pollination. An outline of the ecology of flowers and insects. Washington, D.C., USA, Carnegie Institute of Washington.
Protected Areas provided by Edwin S. George Reserve, University of Michigan, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License